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Deltapooh
01 Sep 03, 14:50
For the past few months, I've been trying to add new images to ATF. However, no matter what I do, I can't turn off that dang blending mode when I rotate an image.

What settings did ProSim use in Paintshop Pro or MS Paint to prevent blending of pixels with the background?

kbluck
02 Sep 03, 13:10
I've had good luck with Photoshop.

No matter what you do, slightly rotated images are going to get "fuzzy". It's a simple consequence of pixels being square and the images not having a lot of pixels in the first place.

I personally have settled on 15 degree increments. First I rotate two images the hard way while touching up the fuzz manually, producing 0, 15, 30. Then I rotate all three of them 45 to generate 45, 60, 75. 45 generates relatively little fuzz. I can then rotate all six 90, 180, and 270 to produce the remaining 18. Multiples of 90 degrees shouldn't cause distortion at all.

Try using as few colors as possible. If you can get by with 16 colors, there won't be any "subtle" variations, so if pixels get blended, it will at least be obvious, so you can fix it. You might also try working in a format that supports transparency, like GIF, and then converting back to BMP and "bucketing" the transparent color back to the appropriate hue when you're done.

--- Kevin

Deltapooh
02 Sep 03, 19:28
I've had good luck with Photoshop.

No matter what you do, slightly rotated images are going to get "fuzzy". It's a simple consequence of pixels being square and the images not having a lot of pixels in the first place.

I personally have settled on 15 degree increments. First I rotate two images the hard way while touching up the fuzz manually, producing 0, 15, 30. Then I rotate all three of them 45 to generate 45, 60, 75. 45 generates relatively little fuzz. I can then rotate all six 90, 180, and 270 to produce the remaining 18. Multiples of 90 degrees shouldn't cause distortion at all.

Try using as few colors as possible. If you can get by with 16 colors, there won't be any "subtle" variations, so if pixels get blended, it will at least be obvious, so you can fix it. You might also try working in a format that supports transparency, like GIF, and then converting back to BMP and "bucketing" the transparent color back to the appropriate hue when you're done.

--- Kevin

I have Adobe Photoshop 6. My version of Paintshop Pro is real old, but I was going to try to install it on my system to see if that would help.

Thanks for the advice. I'll give that a try. (It is somewhat comforting to realize I'm not the only struggling with image editing.)

kbluck
08 Sep 03, 13:10
I've settled on a new technique that works pretty well.

The answer is: don't do your drawing on a pink background. Use a white background instead. Now, when you do your rotation, let it dither the edge pixels all it wants, which actually makes the image look nicer and less "jagged", but the white background won't add any objectionable pink tint to the edge pixels.

Once you're finished, bucket the white background to the correct pink hue, and there you go.

The only problem will appear if you use white on the edge of your drawings. Luckily, military units don't have a whole lot of white in them. I suggest using a very, very light gray for your white objects instead if this is a problem so your bucket operation won't include it.

--- Kevin

Pat Proctor
08 Sep 03, 23:19
To answer your original question, DP, we have a small application that automatically creates the tiles to specifications input (number of rows, columns, and rotation angle).

Unfortunately, we do not have the rights to the software OR the code, so we can neither share it outside of ProSIM Company, nor reproduce the program ourselves.

Of course, if you were to become a ProSIM developer... :p

Deltapooh
09 Sep 03, 10:04
One day I just might ask for a job. :D

Kbluck, I'll try it your way. See what happens.

kbluck
09 Sep 03, 13:57
If you find the dithered border with the white background to be displeasingly light (it looks good in some situations, bad in others), you can try different background colors besides white. Gray, green or brown, for example. Even black, which produces a nicely defined edge in some cases. The point is to find a color that blends nicely with the surroundings, and isn't jarring like the "pink border".

Just watch out for color collisions with your actual object image when you bucket back to pink.

--- Kevin