PDA

View Full Version : Monster Eckmuhl Mod



rahamy
15 Jun 05, 21:20
Gents,

Just posted a package I think is worth looking at...here:

http://www.warfarehq.com/archives/showthread.php?p=1444#post1444

:rifle:

CyberRanger
16 Jun 05, 09:28
Gents,

Just posted a package I think is worth looking at...here:

http://www.warfarehq.com/archives/showthread.php?p=1444#post1444

:rifle:Rich, that's very interesting. For someone sort of new to this series, could you answer a few questions?


Are these scenarios purely hypothetical?
If you don't have NRC, can you still try this?
How do the multi-player games work? If I'm one side 1, do I move my units, then send the file to the next person on my team, etc, until the side 1 turn is complete?
As always, thanks for all you information!

KG_RangerBooBoo
16 Jun 05, 10:02
I can help you with the Muliplayer part of your question. Here is how it usually works.

1.One player on the team is designated the overall commander for the team. He usually makes the final decisions as far as strategy goes.
2. Each player on the team is given command of part of that sides forces. Usually it is pretty natural division of troops, such as you take I Corps and I'll take II Corps, etc.
3. You move your troops and then save the game without ending the turn and forward it on to your teammate(s) and they do the same. Last player on the team to move ends the turn and sends it on to the other side who repeats the process until the game is over.

The HPS engine makes this really easy as each player is able to do his own firing/meleeing as he moves. In the Battleground system everyone had to move and then designate the last player to do all the firing and meleeing trying to follow everyone's instructions or the file had to make the circuit once more, and don't even get me started about having to do defensive fires with that engine also. MP play adds a little bit more to the experience as you can start to get the friction of war effect a little more as orders get misunderstood, etc. Some games that I have been involved in requried that you be represented by one of the officers in the game and you couldn't exchange orders unless you were in the same hex.

rahamy
16 Jun 05, 10:03
Are these scenarios purely hypothetical?


Yes, 100% so.



If you don't have NRC, can you still try this?


Yes, you can try it, but you won't get all the correct graphics. For example in the Hex Info bar you will have Austrian troops showing instead of Russian, but the background will be Green.

In 2D view you are fine, as all of those come with each game, but in 3D you will have Austrian troops show as well. And the mapping could very well be off, so some images might not display properly at all.

It will still be playable though, just not as "pretty" :love:



How do the multi-player games work? If I'm one side 1, do I move my units, then send the file to the next person on my team, etc, until the side 1 turn is complete?
As always, thanks for all you information!

Yes, that's generally how it works. Here's a "canned" message I have written up to share the basics with people...let me know if you still have questions.

------

Here's the breakdown on multi player games. The two of you look at the forces you have available to you and then you decide who commands what. A lot of the time the Game commander decides who commands what, but it is up to you. That is normally the case in bigger games at least. After that you follow the following guide lines...

--------

The following rules are basic guidelines for how the "flow" of a multi-player game should go. They are intended to speed the game up as much as possible and to keep confusion to a minimum.

Each side has a commanding general assigned to the field who will be the point of contact for the opposing army. The game will start with him. He will make his observations and issue orders to the army. A pre-determined rotation will need to be set before the game begins. Each player should always receive his turn from the same player and sends it to the same player.

The file will then be sent to the first commander for his movements, etc. He will perform his movement of his assigned troops and then save the file, but NOT advance the turn, and then send it to the next player. The next player will do the same cycle, again only saving the file and then sending it on.

The commanding officer should have the last view of the file before the turn is advanced. He generally has the "authority" to tie up any loose ends before mailing it on. This depends a lot upon the experience of the players involved though. If you have a veteran player and two new guys on a team then this would apply. If everyone playing is very experienced then a hands-off approach is probably best.

It is my opinion after being involved with several multi-player games, that the number of commanders on the field be limited to 2 or 3 per army including the commanding general. 2 is the ideal number. Any more than 3 and the game becomes almost unplayable (due to people having Real Life interference normally). Multi-player games should also be given a very high priority on the players list of games to complete. Anywhere from 3 or more people will be waiting on you to complete your turn, so please be considerate and do so promptly.

If you will be unable to complete your turn within a 48 hour period let you commander know so he can take care of it for you. If a player is not heard from within a 48 hour period the field commander should perform his turn and send the file on. In the event that the field commander will need to be absent for a period of time, they should designate an alternate. The above is dependant upon the game of course. If everyone going into it agrees to a "relaxed" turn around, and waiting a week or more to get the file back from the opposing army isn't a problem then cool. But those things should be discussed up front before things get rolling. Everyone needs to be on the same page.

As for me, I have no problem waiting a while for a turn...I have loads to keep me busy, but some people only keep 2 or 3 games going and they don't like long delays. It's vital to the success of the game to match people that have similar expectations.

rahamy
16 Jun 05, 10:09
Looks like Mark and I were posting at the same time! :)


As he mentions, there's levels of detail you can get into with a MP game that don't come into play with a regular match. Personally I prefer to have open communications via e-mail and general coordination of our troops.

One thing that should be avoided, especially among "senior" players is critiquing others actions. Focus on the game, don't try to micro manage your partner! I keep this in mind when I am the GC as well, and I discuss the plan with my team mates, then issue strategic orders based on those discussions. I try to stay away from tactical orders unless I really need a guy to take a certain ridge, etc. for my portion of the plan to work.